Replies: 16 (Who?), Viewed: 1021 times.
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#1 Old 2nd Jul 2020 at 12:56 AM Last edited by nitromon : 2nd Jul 2020 at 1:07 AM.
Default Summer Time Overheating Advice
Hi guys,

If you're running it on a laptop like me, you're probably having heating issues during summer time. Well, that and my room can go up to 90*F. So a few things to help you out, some of which I just recently learned. These are helpful in maintaining the longevity of your laptop or desktop.

1) Reapply your thermal paste every 4 years or so. My 1st motherboard died because I neglected to do this. Sims 3 heats up the laptops fast and these pastes get brittle and dry after 4 years. Buy name brand, not imitation generic brands. I use Arctic Silver. It's like $12 and I used it on 6 chips so far and got plenty left. Don't waste money on those $2 generic pastes. If you don't know how to do this, ask someone to do it for you, especially for laptops.

2) Now the way you apply the paste matters. This part I didn't know. I looked up videos before and most people suggest the 1 drop method, which now I realize is terrible. What they recommend is the "X" cross method which mostly will cover the whole GPU/CPU (the chip, not the board). However, I just recently found out that even this method can miss areas of the chip.

What happened was I just reapplied my paste, but I didn't put the heat sink on correctly, it was off the screw. After making adjustment, shifting the heatsink, I locked it down, thinking it wasn't a big deal.

However, when I ran my system, it didn't have much improvement from before repasting. So I decided to open the laptop for a good look. And when I open the heatsink, most of the GPU/CPU are covered... except a couple of corners. I decided to use the "spread" method, using a piece of plastic, spread the paste all over the CPU/GPU and then put it back together.

The result is dramatic. I am testing TS3 now in a hot 80*F room, the GPU is holding at 80*C while the CPU is holding between 70-80*C. Previously, just missing these corners, in a 70*F room, the GPU can run up to 84-86*C and the CPU can get up to 90*C when loading. It hangs at 70-80*C during game play, but can jump up to 87-89*C and 1 core even up to 93*C. All from missing 1 or 2 corners.

3) Core Affinity. Now this one might differ base on OS. I'm on Win 7. Supposely your OS will shuffle your multi-cores etc... but what I notice is that 1 core tends to be always 2-5 degrees hotter. It's the 1st core. Checking the core usage, seems like 1st core is always busy. I gathered that it is because TS3 uses the 1st core as primary core but it is also the core that shares your OS and other functions, so it just gets used more. If you click on the TS3 program while running, check affinity and "disable" the 1st core (and its hyperthread). Essentially, TS3 will use the 2nd core as primary core and this reduces stress on your first core. Since TS3 is a "dual" core program, it actually doesn't affect your game performance. This helps keep the temperatures on all your cores balanced.

4) Anyways, if you haven't gotten a laptop cooling pad, I highly suggest one at around $15-30. It's just a fan to keep the laptop cool. There are ones with coolants, but those can be expensive. I also recently got one of those small portable vaporative (Arctic Air) coolers for my desk, so sometimes I turn that towards the laptop to keep it cool.

5) Finally, when all things fail, create a power plan that only uses 99% of your cpu power in the cpu resource setting. This will turn off your CPU turbo boost and reduce the CPU frequency, massively reducing heating. I run typically at 3.4-3.6GHz turbo, but during summer I created a plan only using 2.6GHz.

Anyways, happy simming, this hot summer! :D

Sanity is overrated.

Nitromon is a type of Pokemon encountered in the Pokemon Nitrome Version series.

There. Mystery solved.
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#2 Old 2nd Jul 2020 at 3:35 AM
"Thermal paste"? Gosh, I've never heard of that. I'll have to look into it. I just use a USB fan. Got it for five bucks at Big Lots and it's surprisingly powerful.
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#3 Old 2nd Jul 2020 at 4:49 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackjackGabbiani
"Thermal paste"? Gosh, I've never heard of that. I'll have to look into it. I just use a USB fan. Got it for five bucks at Big Lots and it's surprisingly powerful.


Yeah unfortunately it is not something that a typical user/consumer knows about. It is more of a tech guy kinda thing. These companies expect people to change a new laptop every 4 years, so they don't mention these things. The thermal paste is what is used to connect the contact between the chip and the heatsink. If you are going to replace the thermal paste, you will need to open up your laptop. In my dad's Dell, I have to remove the keyboard and top panel to remove the heatsink. However, in my HP laptop, I have to disassemble the whole thing and take out the motherboard b/c the heatsink is located on the bottom.

It can be quite tedious and so you need someone who knows what they're doing to do it for you if you need to.

Sanity is overrated.

Nitromon is a type of Pokemon encountered in the Pokemon Nitrome Version series.

There. Mystery solved.
#4 Old 5th Jul 2020 at 1:17 AM
Yeah I'll have to do that then. I have no applied tech skills and my mobility isn't what it should be either so even if I knew what to do it would be hard to do it. But hey, thanks!
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#5 Old 27th Aug 2020 at 7:37 AM
OMG! OMG! If you are repasting your thermal paste, I gotta share this.

1) First of all, I have no idea HP stock thermal paste is actually extremely good. When I first got this laptop, I ran it with Nvidia GPU at 70*C. After 4 years, I had to repaste the GPU/CPU and I could never get it back to 70*C. I thought it was because I changed some settings so it was running hotter.

2) Arctic Silver 3.5 grams for around $8 was the first one I tried 4 years ago and it was giving me Nvidia at 75*C TS3, but eventually it was headed towards 80*C on a hot day.

3) Repasted it again this time with a 4 yr old Arctic Silver, it was not doing as well as before, now still able to do 75*C most times but can get hot into 80*C or even 85*C.

4) Decided to get a new one, bought Arctic MX 4 grams for $10 because I heard great reviews. But it was horrible! Nvidia ran easily at 80*C and hitting 85*C at times. More so, my CPU was hitting 85-90 *C. I don't know what is the deal with this. It is worse than an old 4 yr old Arctic Silver.

5) So finally decided to buy Grizzly's Kryonaut 1 gram for $9, much more expensive and TOTALLY worth it. Finally I got my Nvidia GPU back down to 70*C after 8 yrs and my CPU running at 70-75*C.

1 gram can typically do 2 laptops (1 cpu and 1 gpu each). Thermal pastes have terrible shelf lives so whatever you have left are wasted anyways. I have 3.5 grams of Arctic MX right now, it's going in the garbage, worthless product. Still have at least 2 grams of 4 yr old Arctic silver that I'll never use again. I don't know if this laptop will last another 4 years, but I think next time I'm actually going to try HP stock thermal paste.

Sanity is overrated.

Nitromon is a type of Pokemon encountered in the Pokemon Nitrome Version series.

There. Mystery solved.
Field Researcher
#6 Old 27th Aug 2020 at 3:33 PM
Thanks for that, Nitromon! I'm just about to redo the thermal paste on the desktop and I'll make a note to get the good stuff. (and throw away my old Arctic Silver, LOL).

Dead Ringers
Discord: RedBaroness13
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#7 Old 27th Aug 2020 at 3:40 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChickenMadam
Thanks for that, Nitromon! I'm just about to redo the thermal paste on the desktop and I'll make a note to get the good stuff. (and throw away my old Arctic Silver, LOL).


It comes with a spatula but I suggest doing the X form b/c it is a lot easier. They show you in the instruction booklet. I use the spatula to do the spread method took an hour to apply it just right and took 2 tries, total of 2 hrs. UG!

Anyways, they say that you shouldn't put too much thermal grease, but I think it is always better to be on the heavier side than the light side. I had to redo it because I put too little, even in the spread form it did not sufficiently cover the cpu after it was pressed. So I had to open it up and salvage as much as I could and then added a little more. Basically for a laptop with 2 chips to do, you should use 0.5 gram (1/2 the syringe). Don't skimp, be generous.

Good luck!

Sanity is overrated.

Nitromon is a type of Pokemon encountered in the Pokemon Nitrome Version series.

There. Mystery solved.
Field Researcher
#8 Old 28th Aug 2020 at 4:43 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by nitromon
It comes with a spatula but I suggest doing the X form b/c it is a lot easier. They show you in the instruction booklet. I use the spatula to do the spread method took an hour to apply it just right and took 2 tries, total of 2 hrs. UG!

Anyways, they say that you shouldn't put too much thermal grease, but I think it is always better to be on the heavier side than the light side. I had to redo it because I put too little, even in the spread form it did not sufficiently cover the cpu after it was pressed. So I had to open it up and salvage as much as I could and then added a little more. Basically for a laptop with 2 chips to do, you should use 0.5 gram (1/2 the syringe). Don't skimp, be generous.

Good luck!



I use an old credit card to spread it, actually. Been doing it for a while, just never thought that there were better pastes than the Arctic Silver, which worked great for me in my old rig.

Reminds me I need to grab the one I did for my sister and re-do hers, too - I only play on a desktop setup but I definitely need to take it apart, give it a good clean. With 5 cats, canned air and a miniature vacuum are my constant companions.

Dead Ringers
Discord: RedBaroness13
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#9 Old 28th Aug 2020 at 7:02 PM
Yeah it shouldn't take 2 hrs to spread it. I think I was just being skimpy on the paste that's why I was having a hard time. It is always better to have a little more than too little. As long as it is not a huge blob mess. :D

I've been an arctic silver fan for a long time too. I honestly did not expect the HP stock paste to be so good.

Sanity is overrated.

Nitromon is a type of Pokemon encountered in the Pokemon Nitrome Version series.

There. Mystery solved.
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#10 Old 31st Aug 2020 at 4:25 AM Last edited by nitromon : 31st Aug 2020 at 4:36 AM.
Sorry for the slight bump, but I'm wondering if anyone can answer some questions for me.

So when I used arctic silver 4 years ago, most notable was the CPU where it was cool and under control. However, my GPU was hotter than original.

Now I'm using Grizzly Kryo, it set my GPU so cool, I love it, but I noticed my CPU is hotter than before. Now originally I thought it was because I did not seat it correctly, so after 3 more tries and checking everything... the whole CPU is covered, but not too much, every corner was covered. But it just seemed to be running hotter than before.

Is this because they shared the same heatsink in the laptop? I would imagine heat transfer goes both ways. Since the GPU is much cooler, it means more heat transferred to the heatsink, thus cooling the CPU less b/c the heatsink is already too hot?

I also noticed the 1st 2 cores are much hotter than other cores.

Or is there something else I'm doing wrong?

Edit:
OK this is stupid. So the GPU is running so cool now, the fan is on low, which is why the CPU is running hotter. But I still don't know why some cores are hotter than others.

Sanity is overrated.

Nitromon is a type of Pokemon encountered in the Pokemon Nitrome Version series.

There. Mystery solved.
Inventor
#11 Old 1st Sep 2020 at 1:19 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by nitromon
Is this because they shared the same heatsink in the laptop? I would imagine heat transfer goes both ways. Since the GPU is much cooler, it means more heat transferred to the heatsink, thus cooling the CPU less b/c the heatsink is already too hot?


yes, for some extend; for technical (there is a little space within the laptop) and economical (or rather: logistic, because we are talking about uniform cooling unit usually) separate heatpipes for the CPU and GPU units are rare, and even then usually they're connected as one unit which is an engineering fault of the construction design. And then you have got only one exhaust exit with further limits machine's ability for effective cooling.

However in normal (means: 'average') predicted usage for a expected lifetime (2 years not 4 unfortunately in most popular constructions)* this should be not a problem - again: for 'average' user of expected group of consumers buying such machine. Playing broken game is not the usual usage

Quote:
I also noticed the 1st 2 cores are much hotter than other cores.


this is an one real (physical) core in fact (if we're speaking of mobile and other popular Intels), because it is shared with system and any low level library, it will be working harder ofc. The difference however should not be significant. Cores 0 and 1 (and then 2&3, 4&5 etc.) are in reality one CPU's microunit virtualised as separate "cores", they shares theirs cashes - thus problems with low level attacks like e.g. ZOMBIE (it's design flaw of the every Intel construction of a kind). In mobile constructions (and most consumer ones) you won't find the "true" multicore (like 8 real cores in 8x1 construction) designs. They're too expensive and not viable for such operations. You can enforce the game to use only "free cores" (3 and above) which in general may give you a small efficiency boost; it is honestly mostly useful on older machines, there's no big gain for this in the case of modern ones.


Quote:
]OK this is stupid. So the GPU is running so cool now, the fan is on low, which is why the CPU is running hotter. But I still don't know why some cores are hotter than others.


//'bout the cores is above

not really fan manager (or governor) takes into account average and top temperature of the cooling unit *not* the actual pieces usually (until they reach critical levels raising the system alarms) , if not set otherwise and overwritten by e.g. GPU's drivers. This is usually programmed as negotiable set of units, so for example no matter the system is set for (e.g.) 'silent' (low fan speed) if you play the game, even before the temperatures start to rise, GPU driver should detect activity and raise fan speed a bit to avoid sudden temperature spike resulting in more noise and efficiency degradation. But if the CPU/GPU alert would be raised, especially in critical area (depends of the CPU/GPU ofc) - no matter how the machine is set up it will start 1st. maximize the fan speed, 2nd shut down immediately if it won't work to avoid damage. It's pretty hard to 'cook' the CPU or GPU. Though constant overheating degrade theirs lifetime and will break elements on MB sooner or later (the 1st victims are usually micro-capacitors).

As a rule of thumb I'd advise, in general, always redo pasting on the new bought machine (the factory apply is usually sloppy) and then cleaning and repasting each year or two. This ofc. vary from one use case to another, you should not (for example) expect much if you're working in very humid area/time - effective cooling anything in 100% humidity environment is kind of impossible challenge. You also should clean the fan more often if there is a dusty environment, smokers around, you take the laptop "into the nature" (you will be surprised how much 'internal life' can be found inside sometimes :D), kids uses the machine eating crackers (many school laptop died for that reason) etc.


*that does not mean the machine must fail after 2 years ofc, a lot of (especially) older ones are able to work pretty fine for decades if cared properly, they are just obsolete;

Fox-Lambert (A)RL
hiatus 'till the life run again in the normal-abnormal way
favorite quote: "When ElaineNualla is posting..I always read..Nutella. I am sorry" by Rosebine
self-claimed "lower-spec simmer"
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#12 Old 1st Sep 2020 at 4:33 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElaineNualla
........


Thanks, that's extremely helpful and reassuring. I don't know, I'm still getting a feeling that my CPU is running hotter and I don't know why. Because even when I'm not using the GPU, the CPU usage seems to be hotter and more unstable than before. Is it possible that the GPU/CPU for some reason like different kinds of thermal paste? Because I swear when I first repaste the CPU with Arctic Silver the 1st time, it ran beautifully. All four cores were running 60s to 70s during Sims 3 and well balanced. But my GPU was hot.

Right now, my GPU is beautiful, keeping steady at 70 but the CPU is erratic and the cores are not constant. But there are several factors I might've not considered. One was I don't remember "when" during the year I repaste last time, it might not be summer. Right now, the CPU cores heating are consistent when it is 60-70s like before, but when it gets hotter into the 70-80s that's when there are larger variances between the cores. My most concern is that core 0 tends to have large spikes when it heats up. For example, all four cores would be running at 75-77 degree then suddenly for a second core 0 jumps to 84.

But again, all this could possibly be due to the hot room, making the whole ambient hot and the whole laptop hot. The plastic of the laptop seems to act like an insulator when the room is hot, it takes a while for the temp to drop back down after I close TS3. I'm running it now during a cool morning and it is running cool at 65-70 degree, with no core variance at all. I am somewhat relieved though because I did a stress test yesterday during the hot afternoon running a movie and playing TS3. It got the GPU up to 77 and the CPU up as high as 88, but the GPU never reached the 80 barrier and the CPU never reached 90. So I guess everything is working properly. It may just be how this paste works differently, it seems to work harder at hotter temperatures. On the previous arctic silver, the GPU had ran up to 86 a couple of times, but the CPU had always been cool.

One other thing I noticed and this is going to vary from system to system. But my GPU max temp cut off is 90*C, the fan speed increases to max whenever it hits 74*C and reduces back down to med speed when it drops to 68*C. The funny thing is, the CPU throttle temp is 105*C and it doesn't increase the fan to max unless it hits 90*C. (so both about 15*C below the max temp) So basically right now it is the GPU which determines the fan speed. I guess if they programmed it like this, they know what they're doing, so I should just relax. So overall the new thermal paste made the GPU/CPU more balanced because before the GPU normally runs at 75*C in TS3, so the fan is always on high while the CPU ran well below.

It's weird because I can't remember the last time I played TS3 with the fan only on medium setting.

Sanity is overrated.

Nitromon is a type of Pokemon encountered in the Pokemon Nitrome Version series.

There. Mystery solved.
Inventor
#13 Old 1st Sep 2020 at 5:51 PM
There is another factor you did not considered yet: namely "the Windows" (you are using Windows installation, right?). It's really power hungry mess, always was. That's why on Linux, even considering translation layer, nowadays there's no performance difference or - sometimes - the game performs better as the rumors says (I did not checked this in the case of Sims 3, unlike Sims2 though, so get this with a grain of salt).

Others factors are memory, disk usage (HDDs usually never reached more than 50'C until it was high-speed server-type drive (not really a consumer case), however for a short time modern SDDs are able to get pretty hot during prolonged write cycles (up to 70'C). RAM adds to the overall temperatures, too (though again, until extreme cases, it's not a problem). If it's a "desktop" (usually a tower-type) machine you won't even notice until you start to generate long 4K video, maybe. WIth laptops, however, especially these thin (or thinniest) ones, there are certain limitations.

I usually undervolt the CPU (and the GPU if possible and has any sense, usually not). Unlike overvolting it's pretty secure* and easy to reverse without the hassle. This lowers the basic CPU unit temperatures (well, there is lower energy going through obviously) and despise the fact that this procedure "degrades" the CPU to the lower power class** paradoxally it gives better (because more stable) performance. The CPU is working a tiny bit slower but practically never reaches critical temperatures, therefore it's never forced to throttle - usual source of performance degradation. In theory the CPU (or any unit of a king like GPU) should work just fine in any temperature within it's construction limits (~15 - 105'C in most standard cases)*** however somewhat in the middle is the best sweet spot. I usually keep my CPU +- 20'C below it's critical point.

*the worst case scenario is system instability, but in such case you just raise voltage a bit until it becomes stable without any danger for the hardware. Intel provides it's own software for this, withj AMD CPUs it's unfortunatelly not possible.
**this is actually how Intel differentiates between popular i7/5-5/3 lines, they're basically the same, just set up for different clocks and voltages, sometimes (rarely) part of internal microunits gets disabled. In the nutshell, most of these CPUs are exactly the same with different branding. The side effect of the procedure is prolonged life of the unit.
*** no *do not try to make homemade ultra-low temperature unit* this will be a disaster, without specialized equipment you will just flood the machine with condensing water :D

Fox-Lambert (A)RL
hiatus 'till the life run again in the normal-abnormal way
favorite quote: "When ElaineNualla is posting..I always read..Nutella. I am sorry" by Rosebine
self-claimed "lower-spec simmer"
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#14 Old 1st Sep 2020 at 8:05 PM Last edited by nitromon : 3rd Sep 2020 at 6:48 AM.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElaineNualla
I usually undervolt the CPU (and the GPU if possible and has any sense, usually not).


What do you mean undervolt? Are you using Throttlestop? The only thing I did was created a "summer" power plan set up where I disable the turbo mode so it runs at 2.6GHz instead of 3.6Ghz. Pretty much in 2.6 the CPU will never reach 80*C, usually below 75*C during TS3. Nvidia Inspector has a overclocking feature which allows you to reduce the GPU core clock and memory clock too, I actually didn't realize it until now lol.

So far it seems to be running fine, most of the time the game runs with the fan on medium. Every now and then the GPU could reach 74*C and the fan goes on full and brings it back down to 70*C. But I'm still puzzled why the CPU is spiking so much, I don't remember it was like this before with the arctic silver. Running TS3 it is mostly around the 75-80*C, but sometimes a core (usually core 0) would suddenly spike to 86 for a second. What I'm worried about is because I used the "spread method" when I put on the paste, it might create air pockets. The first time I repasted it with the arctic silver, I just did the blob method since the CPU die is 1 long strip.

----

Edit...

Alright, what the F!!!

Someone riddle me this... why is my laptop CPU running more stable with the laptop cooling pad OFF?!!? It is running slightly hotter, but far less spikes.

Edit:
OK! So apparently different paste have different behavior. Grizzly Kryonaut is good at high temperatures. At low temperature it is more or less the same as Arctic Silver, I guess that's why some people say it really doesn't matter which paste you use if you're just a typical user. They're correct, it makes barely any difference.

However for gamers, once that system heats up, Kyronaut kicks in and prevent it from reaching higher where as Arctic Silver fails in comparison. This is why at low temperature, the laptop cooling pad didn't even mattered.

Sanity is overrated.

Nitromon is a type of Pokemon encountered in the Pokemon Nitrome Version series.

There. Mystery solved.
Inventor
#15 Old 3rd Sep 2020 at 6:13 PM
Undervolting means, well, undervolting "like literally" (does the kids still uses this awful expression? ) - setting the actual voltage of cores, internal GPU, address matrix and I-O components below automatic ones (a few milivolts in practice). This method - obviously opposite for overvolting, which is part of overclocking methods - lowers the energy coming into CPU, subsequently lowering the effective clock and temperatures of the components. Unlike overclocking/overvolting you cannot break anything by doing this.

I do not use Windows actually anymore (except in work unfortunately still) so most of adventures with this platform are missing me. On my machines I use pretty simple recurrent call service for systemd [ https://github.com/georgewhewell/undervolt ]. Intel provided the whole whitle&bells GUI solution for this purpose on Windows. And quick attempt for reaching infinite internet wisdom offered me this: [https://duckduckgo.com/?t=lm&q=undervolting+cpu&ia=web ]

For the general topic - yes, ofc, different pastes have got different physical (and therefore: thermodynamical) features. However from your description I have got feelig that there is something strange with your hardware going on

Fox-Lambert (A)RL
hiatus 'till the life run again in the normal-abnormal way
favorite quote: "When ElaineNualla is posting..I always read..Nutella. I am sorry" by Rosebine
self-claimed "lower-spec simmer"
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#16 Old 3rd Sep 2020 at 7:13 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElaineNualla
For the general topic - yes, ofc, different pastes have got different physical (and therefore: thermodynamical) features. However from your description I have got feelig that there is something strange with your hardware going on


I'm trying to figure that out, the problem is that I didn't take accurate data measures before and a lot of things thought about how my system ran before may not be accurate.

So guess what I did? Yup, I'm a crazy sob.

I actually removed the Grizzly Kryonaut from the CPU (and actually saved it! lol). Then I repasted it with my 4 yr old Arctic Silver. So 2 things I got from that.

1) The Arctic Silver was so much easier to spread. It is more fluidic and less thick.

2) Also because it is old and I have at least 2 grams of it, I used it very generously and it went on smooth.

The result is that for some strange reason, it has far less spikes, but ran a hot hotter in general, well actually about 5 degrees hotter as the reviews said. But I also read that Artic Silver needed 200 hrs of settling time. I don't actually want to wait it out because I wanted to confirm 2 things - 1) still spikes and it does correspond to the load, and 2) core 1 and 2 are slightly hotter than cores 3 and 4. I think it has to do with the position of the heatsink, as it is a U shape coming from the top.

So I scraped off the Arctic Silver and use the syringe to suck them back in. HAHAHA! I'm not sure if that is safe or good etc..., but it is an old paste, I'm saving it for my other older laptop which I don't care for.

Then I actually scraped off the Grizzly from my GPU as well and saved it, and redid both the GPU and the CPU with a clean start, cleaning the die with alcohol. Then using the paste I scraped off and adding a little more, I realized that b/c the Grizzly came in only 1 gram, I was skimpy in application. I noticed when I took off the heatsink, there were parts of the CPU that was not really covered or was just too thin. I didn't see the same thing in my GPU and realized I was more generous with the GPU application because I knew before it would get hotter. When I put in the same amount I would as I did with the Arctic Silver on the CPU, it was so much easier to spread (took 5 mins instead of 2 hrs) and the system is much more stable now. CPU still has some spikes, but they correspond to the load, but generally now it runs TS3 at around 75*C.

So all this I concluded, be generous with the paste. Don't overdo it, but a little more is always safer than having too little.

Sanity is overrated.

Nitromon is a type of Pokemon encountered in the Pokemon Nitrome Version series.

There. Mystery solved.
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#17 Old 11th Sep 2020 at 9:46 PM
Bumping this b/c of more info:

So there was some issue concerning my laptop heating this time round and I finally got it resolved.

None issue:
1) Core 1 and 2 seem to run hotter: Checked with various thermal paste and this is not an issue with the paste as it is just how it is. I suspect the orientation of the heatsink design is the reason along with core 1 and 2 being used more overall. It is just more noticeable with a better paste b/c more heat transfer showing the gap between the different core temp.

Partial issue:
2) CPU running hotter now. The laptop heatsink connects the GPU and the CPU. I actually thought it was a U shape through the fan, but it actually is a complete circle. There is a direct copper bar connecting the GPU/CPU heatsink, I suppose it balances the 2 out. However, I did noticed one thing, which is my old CPU fan had a crack in the casing, which the airflow was escaping rather than through the intake/outtake. I super-glued the casing shut, it seemed to have dropped my overall temperature even more.

Big issue:
3) Spiking! Random spikes are normal and correspond to the load, however it should never be more than 5 degree. I was getting major spikes from 70*C to 87*C. I redid the thermal paste 5 times trying to balance it out, maybe the heatsink is not seated, etc... but it didn't change. Finally, I resolved the issue.

CLEAN your heatsink! The copper plate connected to the bar is suppose to be separated from the metal cap holding the plate down. From what I can tell, it was glued together by high heat glue or at least connected at the top center of the copper plate. What happened was when I wiped the old Arctic Silver and MX off the heatsink, I accidentally filled the gap between the metal cap and the copper plate, essentially connecting the two thermally as one. And I don't know it if was worse, but it just happened to be on the side that the copper bar was connected to the GPU.

So essentially a lot of the heat from the GPU didn't go through the heatsink on the CPU side, instead the heat went into the metal cap that holds the heatsink, thus heating the CPU. Since the CPU is still rapidly working with the heatsink trying to cool itself down, that is where the thermal spikes have been occurring.

Using a piece if plastic, a needle, and rubbing alcohol, I cleaned out the gaps and separated the heatsink from the metal cap. Now the system is running like before, very stable, with spikes not more than 5 degree. This also is responsible for the overall CPU heat increase, the CPU is now running noticeably cooler 5-10 degrees.

*sigh* Took me 5 repasting to finally figured this out.

----

This is wicked sick!

Running TS3 right now in a 22-23*C room:
Nvidia GPU: 66*C
i7 CPU: 70*C (as low as 66*C and as high as 78*C)

Sanity is overrated.

Nitromon is a type of Pokemon encountered in the Pokemon Nitrome Version series.

There. Mystery solved.
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