Replies: 8 (Who?), Viewed: 1002 times.
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#1 Old 24th Apr 2020 at 6:25 PM
Default Inside of the Community School for Gifted.
So previous time in a testing save game, I had deleted the rabbit hole and tried recreating the SV school's exterior layout with a build of my own. I got curious so I took examination by looking through as to how many classroom it possible has, and I learned something new about it:

- Most of the classrooms on the bottom (exception of the back building) seem to be represent those for elementary/preschool attending pupils or those of very young age students, while most of the classrooms on second floor allude a high school? It's quite hard to examine the building through build mode, but what I had picked up is:
- Classroom that share two windows followed one by another (with the exception of the back side's center part of the build) depict a single classroom.
- Therefore there are eight class room in the front side, and seven on the back, making it a total 15 according from the outside viewpoint.
- Dunno why, but EA's when designing the cupboards in the windows made a glitch where the becnhes are facing different positions when looking from a different side of the windowed wall.
- Some classesrooms on the second floor feature a white board and a map, while those located from the sides of the build have two computers on main desks. Possible all have book shelfs
- The classrooms in the back section seem to mean either a lab or art rooms, with both floors having workstations (counters) with particular floor not including seating benches.
- The entrace in the front seem to show a desk for a receptionist (forgot what they're called), while the back entrance is a small square hall that leads to three classrooms, which I suppose are there for emergency evacuation.


The building, the viewpoint of the outside through windows:

P.S. Sorry for my bad english.
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Mad Poster
#2 Old 24th Apr 2020 at 10:33 PM
That's all for decoration though. When sims are inside of a rabbithole, they aren't interacting with the things that we can see by peering through a window or zooming in on the shell building. They are progressing scholastically or not by way of the game's programming, but their movements are frozen.
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#3 Old 24th Apr 2020 at 10:46 PM
Yes I know that. I just thought that each classroom differs drastically, but on further inspection while writing the thread I realize the classroom don't different between periods so I didn't ask for any americans to clarify since they been in that type of school whjat these rooms represent.

P.S. Sorry for my bad english.
Theorist
#4 Old 25th Apr 2020 at 6:29 AM Last edited by daisylee : 25th Apr 2020 at 6:40 AM.
In the US unless in a tiny, tiny, tiny town and maybe not even that anymore, schools are not mixed. There are elementary schools and high schools. And depending on the size of the place and number of students junior high schools. Sometimes the Jr are with the elementary or high. But the days of the one room schoolhouse are long gone in the US everywhere afaik, and so you normally would not have elementary and definitely not preschool with high school. Students are often bussed to the closest schools for the right age. They are not combined into one usually.

As for the Sims RH they just are what they are. I do not study them.

An exception is some small private schools. I attended one that went through elementary up through HS. But the public system did not operate that way. I was there 5-9 grades. If in public would have been in 2-3 schools instead of just the one.
Instructor
#5 Old 25th Apr 2020 at 3:39 PM
In Poland it's not uncommon to see primary and high schools or technical schools with vocational schools running in one building as a school complex. As far as sims are concerned, the only thing I noticed inside the school rabbithole was the reversed map of the USA in one of the classrooms.
Mad Poster
#6 Old 25th Apr 2020 at 4:16 PM
In the school district where I grew up (in the US), we had a two-room schoolhouse that was still standing back then and it probably still is. It was built in 1820 or something, and must have housed the equivalent of K-12 back when the town had fewer than 50 students total whereas my high school graduating class alone was over 440. It wasn't part of the school system anymore, but instead was rented out for meetings and parties. It was kind of cool seeing it maintained as it must have looked when it was really functional, but with electricity and indoor plumbing added in. There weren't any computer workstations in place that I remember.
Theorist
#7 Old 26th Apr 2020 at 3:09 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by igazor
In the school district where I grew up (in the US), we had a two-room schoolhouse that was still standing back then and it probably still is. It was built in 1820 or something, and must have housed the equivalent of K-12 back when the town had fewer than 50 students total whereas my high school graduating class alone was over 440. It wasn't part of the school system anymore, but instead was rented out for meetings and parties. It was kind of cool seeing it maintained as it must have looked when it was really functional, but with electricity and indoor plumbing added in. There weren't any computer workstations in place that I remember.


I think it is great that it was kept in good condition or at least was restored, and was still being used. There is a very old open barn in my area that is maintained and used for private events.
Undead Molten Llama
#8 Old 29th Apr 2020 at 5:32 AM
I come from Amish land (I lived in rural northeastern Indiana until I went to college, and the dairy farm I grew up on was run by Amish folks that my parents hired), and the Amish still have and use one-room schoolhouses. Of course, they also only attend school through 8th grade (around 13-14 years old) and Amish communities are small, so they can have that. However, there are some private schools in the US that are kindergarten through 12th grade in one complex. I technically graduated from one; my graduating class was 57 students. Such schools are not usually one building, though. The one I went to was much like a mini-university, with dorms (It was a boarding school, though there were day students, too) and classroom buildings and a playground for the littles and a smallgym/auditorium and a chapel and even a stable since many of the boarding students owned horses and competed in dressage and eventing and whatnot, and they brought their horse with them to school to train and practice.

In Sims terms, if I were playing a small rural/agrarian world with a small population, then I think a one-building schoolhouse for all would be appropriate. If it was a more-populated world and I were to do a non-rabbithole school in TS3, I'd probably do two separate lots, one with a primary school and one with a secondary. (I'm sure there must be a way to "assign" children to one and teens to the other? Maybe not?) OR, I'd do a big lot with two (or more) buildings on it and pretend it's the sort of school that I attended. In the latter case, maybe I'd even use stadium and equestrian center rabbithole rugs on the same lot.

If we're talking about set-ups, in American public schools, primary school students are segregated by grade level and tend to stay in one classroom and have the same teacher all day for all subjects, except they'll go to different rooms for "specials" like gym, art, music, etc.; specials are usually only once or twice a week. In middle school/junior-high and up, students go to different classrooms with different teachers for each subject. In this arrangement, you could have some classes with students in different grades, even. At least, that's how it was for the one of my kids that went to public school.

I'm mostly found on (and mostly upload to) Tumblr these days because, alas, there are only 24 hours in a day.
Muh Simblr! | An index of my downloads on Tumblr.
Sockpuppet
#9 Old 9th May 2020 at 3:45 PM
I think there would be one class for the children, one for the early teens, and one for the late teens.
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